☆ time flies.

I’m a part of other’s memories,
Before the wings of time begin to soar.

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This video is in the eyes of an ex lover who was obviously, a photographer photographing someone he love(s/d). The main character plays through my different aspects and personalities, and fortunately, the actress may be the one person who knows me better than I know myself.  

The final video poem was created after consideration of feedback from the first two: “layer more sounds to make it more interesting;” “stick with similar situations, and create deeper connections between scenes.”

There are four distinctive pieces and to keep them different, I found contrasting sounds that would be special to only each scene alongside combining both diegetic and non-diegetic sounds to add extra layers. For example, in kitchen scene, since the window is open, I added bird sounds; foreign morning news; the kettle; her footsteps; background music. 

I am highly fascinated by and have almost followed continuity editing, religiously. As soon as I knew this project was no longer still videos, I wanted to experiment with different combinations of angles for a singular scene. I contemplated a longer and more detailed video as I had done a ridiculously high number of angle shots but Etienne had said, “If your company or boss requests you make a video with a time limit of one minute, it’s best you do just that.” Also, I focused more on editing as it is evidently more important to correctly assemble shots as opposed to just taking good shots. 

Filmography and audio, combined, were to give the audience a sense of understanding and empathy – an emotional reaction through the more symbollic scenes. The disparate 4 pieces is individually, a collection of prose and together, a short story. It is the integration of two ideologies: ‘behind the photographer’s eyes’ and ‘I’m part of other’s memories before the wings of time begin to soar.’

video experimentation

Lately, I’ve been trying to learn a little bit more about video production.

Above is video of me trying to learn about using different angles of video to create a coherent sequence. It is very simple and just aims to try and get as much interaction with angles as I could.

Here is another video that me and Claire edited and put together after the whole class had collaborated to produce a 1 minute scene, through multiple cameras in different angles and one director to lead.

This experience made me realise that the ability to manipulate the existing videos through edit is what truly produces a consistent storyline. Still, it’s good to have multiple angles to work with!

☆ a photographer’s footsteps.

Instead of compassing a general and mainstream approach of finding noise and making art out of it, I let my second creation be one of modernity and personality. It tells a story. With voice, music, physical interaction with objects and the sounds of the environment. 

I wanted to put the viewer in the life of a photographer; I desired to record movements and actions.

Beginning with making coffee to illustrate early morning; the boiling of the kettle and pouring of milk (relevant to my remoscope). The ringing sound of the phone then leads the subject walking. “I’m coming, I’m coming!” she says; hinting at the tardiness trait that I possess. The sound of an engine turning on led by music on the radio before sounds of waves and cameras flashing.

I’m a photographer. I communicate through photographs. This narrates the morning of a photoshoot.

I had asked myself 2 questions that were to be answered with my creation.

Firstly, what is something audio can do that video cannot?

Being a hard-of-hearing person myself, it was a difficult one to answer. Placing a greater emphasis on audio limits our preconceived notions, providing a unique experience and perspective. Additionally, where visuals facilitate the process in providing the viewer with a direct story, audio gives it more sense of mystery and this forms the viewer’s curiosity. 

Thirdly, how could I indicate the act of photography via audio? 

I idealised the concept in which I have the subject state what they’re showing in the photograph – each time, a different person and a different message, – after each click.

The sound after each click is a capture of the ending paragraph of my “where I’m from” poem.

☆ sea minerals and unsaid words.

I’m from sea minerals and the sky full of words unsaid.

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My narrative and response to ‘Where I’m from,’ (George Ella Lyon).  follows the life of someone who feels happiness in the smallest details of life; in writing, travelling and nature.

My story begins with the rockpool tides of the beach to automatically give the viewer a sense of belonging and serenity – the kind of aura I want my presence to radiate. Accompanied by a friend to erase any eruptions of loneliness. A car-ride then directs the audience to the home in which I make coffee- sweet coffee (a quirky addiction of mine), the first step to releasing the poet in me. Additionally, the fact that I am currently struggling with writer’s block is symbolised by my writing being burned by natural flame from a candle. Eventually, ending with my mother’s smiling face as a candle dies, the stress dispenses.

I was inspired by NELL’s music video, “The Day Before.” and decided to centre my video poem around a feeling of beautiful melancholy – as people describe me as “chaotically wise.”

“where I’m from”

I’m from sweet coffee and fried rice,
     the smell of tropical trees
and busy cities with traffic lights;
I’m a part of other’s memories
before the wings of time begin to soar

I am from Bali sand,
my first steps and my mother’s cheers
     from colours and wind
     and ‘aku cinta kamus’
the missing heir of Java throne;
I’m from my great grandfather’s dreams,
     his desire to wed away from sovereignty

I’m from sea minerals and stardust,
and I’ve a back long bare
since my brother stopped being being there
I’m from my mother’s lost love
and her warnings of caution

I’m from planes and boats,
     unpacking in a new place every few years
fed up with my father’s camera;
yet endless photos I own